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Homemade Guayusa Rapé | Clear Energy | Guayusa ilex & Yarumo | #52
Homemade Guayusa Rapé | Clear Energy | Guayusa ilex & Yarumo | #52Homemade Guayusa Rapé | Clear Energy | Guayusa ilex & Yarumo | #52Homemade Guayusa Rapé | Clear Energy | Guayusa ilex & Yarumo | #52

Homemade Guayusa Rapé | Clear Energy | Guayusa ilex & Yarumo | #52

$13.00$110.00

Our latest and Wouters’ favourite

Origin: Ecuador

Common Names: Rapa dos Indios, Indian Snuff, Hape, Rapay

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Product Description

Homemade Guayusa Rapé | Clear Energy | Guayusa ilex & Yarumo | #52

This unique Homemade Guayusa Rapé is made with the increasingly famous Guayusa ilex leaf and Ecuadorian Yarumo ash. Research into the historical use of rapé proves that Guayusa ilex was one of the traditional used plants in ancient rapé’s. It has been lost in more recent history as far as we know but this homemade guayusa rapé should bring back the good old rapé days to us at least a little.

Our Guayusa ilex whole leaves are wild-crafted by Quechua (Kichwa) people in the primary Amazon jungle in Ecuador. They are shade dried on ceremonial Quechua land surrounded by wild gardens full of medicinal plants.

Needless to say that our Guayusa is not treated in any way. The sun dried it, that’s all.

The plants is grown in a chacra,  a Quechua forest garden. No fertilizers nor chemicals are used. Basically the sustainable nutrients flow between the species the same way the rain forest contains itself without any human intervention.

The leaves are gathered and dried, then traditionally drunk as a tea in the early morning hours among indigenous peoples of the rainforest, as they recounted their night’s dreams, myths and stories.

Focus – Night Watchman

The I. guayusa has become predominately a cultivated tree, mostly in the regions of Ecuador, Peru and Colombia. Once the leaves have been harvested, they are hung out to dry where the robust earthy flavors develop. Traditionally the Quechua have boiled the leaves in water and drink this decoction for its stimulating effects, which are also considered to bring a clear focus and concentration that is not followed by the typical caffeine crash of other stimulants such as coffee. Known as “The Night-Watchman”,  hunters will consume I. guayusa while hunting to maintain alert and focused throughout the night and to sharpen their senses.

Content

Chemically speaking, I. guayusa contains xanthines such as caffeine, along with two other species of the Holly genus, Ilex paraguariensis, or Yerba Mate, and Ilex vomitaria, or Yaupon Holly. It also contains theobromine, found in the cacao bean, L-theanine, found in green tea, glucatamic acid, feluric acid and chlorogenic acid. It also contains 15 essential amino acids and has over 300 antioxidants.

History

According to the Jivaro people, Guayusa is so habituating, visitors to the jungle were warned before drinking the tea. As they believed that once a person drinks Guayusa, they will return to the jungle forever after.

The Quechua have foretold of a story, where their ancestors prayed for a plant that would teach them to dream. They were shown in a vision of the Guayusa tree, which they then took back to their village.  It has been enjoyed among their people ever since. Known as a plant to induce visions in the dreamtime, the Quechua would be able to foretell whether hunting expeditions would be favorable.

A very well known ethnobotanist, Richard Evan Schultes found a bundle of I. guayusa in the tomb of a medicine man high in the Bolivian Andes Mountains, which is far outside of its growing environment.

What is Rapé?

Rapé, pronounced ‘ha-pey’ is a tradition used by various indigenous tribes of South America, predominantly from the tribes people of Brazil and Peru. Rapé is a snuff which is blown into each nostril through a pipe known as a ‘Tepi’.  Which is either made from a hollow bone or bamboo. Each tribe has their own formula of plants, trees, seeds, most commonly combined with a pure form from the Amazon and an ash called tsunu, or others like Muricci, Yarumo, or Inga. The rapé is prepared in a ritualistic way by specific members of the tribe.

Spirit of Nature

In some tribes, it is the women who gather the ingredients and make the Rapé, and others are made by the healer of the tribe. Typically they are made in small batches with specific intentions for the ceremony or person being treated. These are very powerful, profoundly healing and cleansing on many levels. The use of Rapé aims to connect one to the spirits of nature while invoking that power to bring about physical and spiritual healing.

Kuripe or Tepi

Traditionally, it is administered through either the Tepi or Kuripe. The Kuripe is a for self-administration and the Tepi is used when blowing the snuff for another person. The V-shaped applicator or Kuripe, connects the nostril to the mouth. The Tepi is a long blow pipe that connects the nostril of the receiver with the mouth of the blower, who then blows the rapé into the nose of the receiver.

Opening the Chakras

In general, the tribes believe Rapé facilitates the opening and clearing of the chakras, facilitates a sense of grounding and connection to the earth.  Some think it supports the release of disease from the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual bodies.  Furthermore some say that using rapé opens the third-eye chakra, decalcifies the pineal gland, clears mental fog and confusion. Finally it releases negative thought patterns and most of all it supports our connection to the breath and expands our connection to Spirit.

Find out more

Would you like to know more about the Amazon indigenous people? Check this interesting website.